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Press Archives

2012 Press Archive

GHTC 2013 Press Kit

2013 Press Releases


 

PRESS RELEASE

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Contact: ScienceNews Radio Network, 214-329-4949 colonel@prfirm1.com

 

NASA Studies Most Important Planet

The Applied Sciences Program at National Aeronautics & Space Administration a feature at the IEEE international humanitarian conference in Silicon Valley

 

DALLAS (Oct. 7, 2013) – Dr. Christine Lee, an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow for the NASA Applied Sciences Program will be a feature speaker in Silicon Valley when IEEE presents their humanitarian conference two weeks from today.

Lee works closely with program managers in the water resources application area. NASA is in the news most recently for interplanetary exploration with moon shots, stunning Mars landings, and a probe that recently left our solar system. But NASA mainly “studies the most important planet we know of,” says Lee, “our own.”

Lee spoke by Skype on the ScienceNews Radio Network program Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason from her home in Foggy Bottom near D.C., not able to work because of the recent government shutdown by republicans. On the program Lee described NASA’s Capacity Building Program. The broadcast originates in Dallas, Texas, and can now be heard Webcast and archived for its world audience. A photo of Lee at work in the field in Kenya can be seen at a related story in the Examiner here.

Lee received her Ph.D. (2010) in environmental engineering at UCLA, developing rapid methods for measuring microbial contamination in coastal urban watersheds. Her postdoctoral work at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory included studying microbial communities in extreme environments such as those in Mt. Kilimanjaro glaciers and in the Antarctic Dry Valley soil as part of an astrobiology lab. She has conducted fieldwork in Southern California as well as Bangladesh, Tanzania, Mexico, and Antarctica.

The third annual IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC) is October 21- 23in Silicon Valley. Registration has been ongoing for several weeks.

For five years Lee was an active participant and student leader in Engineers without Borders, also a partner with IEEE at this event, during which she founded a computer refurbishing and education program for local high schools and had the opportunity to travel to Guatemala to set up a computer lab in a community center. Lee received a Switzer Foundation Environmental Leadership Fellowship in 2008-09 and co-authored a funded proposal for the EPA People, Planet, and Prosperity Student Design Competition in 2009-10.

 


 

 

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Contact: ScienceNews Radio Network, 214-329-4949 colonel@prfirm1.com

 

River Blindness Breakthrough

New early detection of neglected tropical disease to be highlighted at the IEEE international humanitarian conference in Silicon Valley

 

Dallas (July 15, 2013) – A rapid test for river blindness that is a breakthrough for the control and elimination of this dreaded tropical disease will be presented at the IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC) October 21- 23 in Silicon Valley.

River blindness, or onchocerciasis (pronounced on-cho-sir-sy-ah-sis) has been largely neglected because it has no cure while afflicting a million people in Africa. Black fly bites carry the microbe that forms itchy worms in the human skin and results in blindness after years of suffering. The new test has been developed by PATH of Seattle, WA. It will be manufactured and distributed by Standard Diagnostics.

Drugs produced by Merck can kill the enfant worms in early detection, but only control adult worms that live for up to 15 years. Those afflicted must know when it is safe to stop the treatments. This new diagnostic field test uses only one drop of blood and will “monitor the transmission of the disease,” says Tala de los Santos, group leader for diagnostics at PATH. “The test can help provide the evidence” for when the drug administration can be safely stopped” in already afflicted victims.

Speaking by phone from her office in Seattle, de los Santos made her report today on the ScienceNews Radio Network program Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason. The program originates in Dallas, Texas, and can now be heard Webcast and archived for its world audience. A photo of de los Santos working in her lab can be seen at a related story in the Examiner.

PATH is an international nonprofit organization that works in more than 70 countries delivering lifesaving vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, and devices in collaborative programs with communities.

This is the first time PATH has been featured at the cross-discipline conference on the world’s urgent human necessities. IEEE’s GHTC will be held October 20 – 23, 2013 in Silicon Valley, San Jose Airport Garden Hotel, California, the third annual. More information on technical sessions, registration for the conference, hotel reservations and exhibiting is available at the website www.ieeeghtc.org.

 


 

 

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Contact: ScienceNews Radio Network, 214-329-4949 colonel@prfirm1.com

 

Google to Keynote Humanitarian Conference

Government solutions giving way to social media revolutions in disaster relief to be highlighted at the IEEE international humanitarian conference in Silicon Valley

 

San Jose, CA (July 2, 2013) – A treat for those attending the IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC) October 21- 23in Silicon Valley will be a keynote address by Google’s Nigel Snoad.

A brilliant young Australian, Snoad is Product Manager, Crisis Response and Civic Innovation at Google; also a core team member at Random Hacks of Kindness.

Snoad believes that through everyday tools like Twitter, Google searches, open data, Smart Search, etc., current methods of crisis response will change for the better. “Citizens are being empowered with the information so they can look after themselves and protect their families and neighborhoods, and work with each other,” said Snoad, speaking by phone from his office in New York City on the ScienceNews Radio Network program Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason. The program originates in Dallas, Texas, and can now be heard Webcast and archived for its world audience.

On the program Mason asked Snoad if there was rather a real danger from social media in the spreading of dangerous misleading information. “Error correction and rumor correction tends to travel faster than the bad information,” answered Snoad, “there’s a pile of research on this.”

Snoad went on to predict a future dramatically different from today’s reliance only on government solutions. “The more that we can do to enable citizens to work together, to understand what’s happening around them, communicate, listen to the authorities-the better off they’re going to be and the stronger our communities and neighborhoods are going to be,” said Snoad, “that’s an awesome thing.” A photo of Snoad can be seen at a related story in the Examiner.

This is the third annual cross-discipline conference on the world’s urgent human necessities and will be held October 20 – 23, 2013 in Silicon Valley, San Jose Airport Garden Hotel, California. Organizers report the website is active “around the clock” with thousands of visitors from all continents except Antarctica. More information on technical sessions, registration for the conference, hotel reservations and exhibiting is available at the website www.ieeeghtc.org.

 


 

 

PRESS RELEASE

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Contact: ScienceNews Radio Network, 214-329-4949 colonel@prfirm1.com

 

FEMA Changing Structure Dramatically

The IEEE international humanitarian conference in Silicon Valley will showcase revolutionary changes developing inside the federal relief agency

 

San Jose (June 18, 2013) – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has been quietly undergoing dramatic changes in operations, and details of its new structure will be a feature at the IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC) October 21- 23in Silicon Valley.

“It seem mistakes of the past that have haunted FEMA are gone,” says Colonel Mason, managing editor of the ScienceNews Radio Network, a reporter covering the conference. “A whole new way of thinking, a whole new structure is being built into FEMA since the terrible mistakes of Katrina (the hurricane that hit New Orleans in 2005).” Mason points to FEMA response from hurricane Sandy that hit the northeast last year and recent tornados in Missouri, Texas and Oklahoma that has garnered high praise from those state’s governors.

A major addition at FEMA has been the designation of a new officer, Chief Innovation Advisor (CIA), who brings a formally stilted structure down to street level where it can do the most good very rapidly. “The best solutions are generated by the people and communities who are closest (to the disasters),” says Desiree Matel-Anderson, the CIA who will be presenting at the conference.

Also working with FEMA and presenting with Matel-Anderson is Willow Brugh of MIT Media Labs and Geeks without Bounds, who told Mason the new relief structure is using “a wider, deeper pool of empowered citizens in a flattened organization.” Brugh made her comments by phone on the ScienceNews Radio Network program Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason. The program originates in Dallas, Texas, and can now be heard Webcast and archived for its world audience. See photo and Examiner story here.

This is the third annual cross-discipline conference on the world’s urgent human necessities and will be held October 20 – 23, 2013 in Silicon Valley, San Jose Airport Garden Hotel, California. Organizers report the website is active “around the clock” with thousands of visitors from all continents except Antarctica. More information on technical sessions, registration for the conference, hotel reservations and exhibiting is available at the website www.ieeeghtc.org.

 


 

PRESS RELEASE

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Contact: ScienceNews Radio Network, 214-329-4949 colonel@prfirm1.com

 

Humanitarian Engineering Gains New Recognition

Awards nominations deadline fast approaching to celebrate achievements in the field of global humanitarian engineering

 

San Jose (May 17, 2013) – The closing for nominations in Global Humanitarian Engineering Awards is coming up rapidly. The international awards will celebrate outstanding contributions to humanitarian engineering.

The two award categories for 2013 are: Global Humanitarian Engineer of the Year and Global Humanitarian Project of the Year. Nominations close June 2nd 2013, and the awards will be presented in Silicon Valley at the IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference October 21-23.

Press coverage of the conference exhibits and presentations will be carried extensively on the ScienceNews Radio Network program Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason, produced in Dallas, Texas.

The awards started with Rebecca Dracup and Andrew Perren, two engineering students at the University of Western Australia in 2012. Until now it has been very difficult to find stories of success about engineering and engineers in the humanitarian and development sectors so they created the Global Humanitarian Engineering Awards (GHEA) with the help of the IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference and Engineers Without Borders Australia.

“We opened nominations on May 1st 2013 and are hoping to attract nominations from every corner of the world”, Perren said.

To nominate or learn more about GHEA 2013 visit http://www.ieeeghtc.org/global-humanitarian-engineering-award.

 


 

PRESS RELEASE

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Contact: ScienceNews Radio Network, 214-329-4949 colonel@prfirm1.com

 

Fantastic Med Devices New Reality

Hand-held diagnostics; drastic cuts in medical expenses; nano engineering to abolish diseases; everyone aging well into our 100s; all to be revealed at humanitarian technology conference

 

DALLAS (April 29, 2013) – Use of hand-held diagnostic scanners often fancied on sci-fi movies such as Star-Trek are now a reality and will soon be common in remote world areas, and then everywhere. That and other fantastic life advances will be featured at the influential IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology conference (GHTC) in Silicon Valley this fall.

The science fiction type quality of our diagnostic tools is being built into our mobile phones. “The cellphone itself is an amazing platform,” says Aydogan Ozcan, leading the Bio and Nano Photonics laboratory at UCLA. Dr. Ozcan will make his presentations as keynote speaker at the IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference 2013, October 20-23, at the San Jose Airport Garden Hotel, California.

“The optical components on the cellphone are very advanced, doubling in megapixels every two years,” says Ozcan. We “can easily convert (them) into advanced microscopy or diagnostic tools. Bench top versions of the same technology are expensive and bulky.” The same tests can now be done in the field which make these cellphone devices ideal for remote areas of the world.

Ozcan spoke by phone from his office at UCLA on the ScienceNews Radio Network program, the Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason. The program originates in Dallas, Texas, and is now archived and Webcast for its world audience. On the program Mason asked Ozcan if he sees a time when the molecules of diseases will be manipulated at the atomic level to make them harmless. “That is the holy grail of telemedicine,” answered Ozcan, “I think that is the revolution we are going to see.”

And Ozcan even predicts a time frame. “This next decade will be quite fascinating,” he says, “we are going to increase our lifespan to routinely 100s in the next decade or so.” Ozcan points out that everybody caries a cellphone so health management of an aging population will be extremely important. And Ozcan says this will dramatically cut medical expenses because prevention is so much less costly than treating chronic illness. [A photo of Ozcan at work can be seen at this Examiner link]

This is the IEEE flagship third annual cross-discipline conference on the world’s urgent human necessities, sponsored by NASA, UNESCO, Engineers Without Borders, Engineering for Change, and will be held October 20 – 23, 2013 in Silicon Valley, San Jose Airport Garden Hotel, California. Organizers report the website is active “around the clock” with thousands of visitors from all continents except Antarctica. More information on technical sessions, registration for the conference, hotel reservations and exhibiting is available at the website www.ieeeghtc.org.

 


 

PRESS RELEASE

To: All Press
Release: Immediate
Contact: ScienceNews Radio Network, 214-329-4949 colonel@prfirm1.com

 

Humanitarian Conference Gets New Global Sponsor

Engineers Without Borders has joined list of sponsors for the IEEE Global humanitarian conference coming to Silicon Valley

 

DALLAS (Mar. 18, 2013) – Dedication to humanitarian relief worldwide continues to grow each year as the influential IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC) moves to San Jose, California. Organizers report the website is active “around the clock” with thousands of visitors from all continents except Antarctica.

Now the respected relief organization, Engineers Without Borders (EWB), has joined a growing list of conference sponsors. With world challenges “there’s one thing that I know, and that’s change is going to continue to happen,” says Catherine Leslie, executive director of EWB, “if it’s not global warming it’s going to be something else.”

Leslie spoke by phone from her office in Boulder, Colorado, on the ScienceNews Radio Network program, the Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason. The program originates in Dallas, Texas, and is now archived and Webcast for its world audience. [A photo of Leslie at work can be seen at this Examiner link.]

On joining with IEEE to sponsor the GHTC, Leslie told Mason “I don’t want to see the status quo anymore. When I went to Nepal on the ‘80s it kinda looks the same today in some of those communities, and I don’t want that to happen in the next twenty years.”

This is the IEEE flagship third annual cross-discipline conference on the world’s urgent human necessities, sponsored by NASA, UNESCO, Engineers Without Borders, Engineering for Change, and will be held October 20 – 23, 2013 in Silicon Valley, San Jose Airport Garden Hotel, California. More information on technical sessions, registration for the conference, hotel reservations and exhibiting is available at the website www.ieeeghtc.org.

http://www.examiner.com/article/humanitarian-conference-gets-new-global-sponsor

 


 

PRESS RELEASE

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Contact: ScienceNews Radio Network, 214-329-4949 colonel@prfirm1.com

 

Silicon Valley Leading Global Relief Initiatives

Technology to cure world’s greatest human problems being launched globally from the valley with IEEE humanitarian conference

 

DALLAS (Mar. 4, 2013) – The decision to move the influential IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology conference from Seattle to San Jose this year is to align with scientific relief capabilities already operating in the valley. “There’s a good synergy in the Silicon Valley already for humanitarian type efforts and issues,” says Keith Moore, chairman of the 2013 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, “we’ve got a lot of folks who are on fire, anxious to build the future.”

Before moving to San Jose, California, the first two years saw the conference held in Seattle, Washington. After those successes, the conference was courted by major locations worldwide. Producers, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), accepted bids from many dynamic cities before this year choosing a Valley location.

The plan “is to keep it in North America right now for the main conference, and have satellite conferences,” said Moore, who is also considering Europe and Africa next year, “but this year there is a conference planned called the South Asian Satellite Conference” in India for August.

Moore spoke by phone from his HQ location on the ScienceNews Radio Network program, the Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason. The program originates in Dallas, Texas, and is now archived and Webcast for its world audience. [A photo of Moore working with field relief agencies in Malawi can be seen at this Examiner link.]

The conference organizing committee has issued a call for papers. Sought are scientists, engineers, technology professionals, academics, foundations, government and non-government organizations, field project managers, industry, investors, and other individuals engaged in humanitarian work, to discuss and develop solutions for present and future humanitarian needs.

This is the IEEE flagship third annual cross-discipline conference on the world’s urgent human necessities, sponsored by NASA, UNESCO, Engineers Without Borders, Engineering for Change, and will be held October 20 – 23, 2013 in Silicon Valley, San Jose Airport Garden Hotel, California. More information on technical sessions, registration for the conference, hotel reservations and exhibiting is available at the website www.ieeeghtc.org.

http://www.examiner.com/article/silicon-valley-leading-global-relief-initiatives

 


 

PRESS RELEASE

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Contact: ScienceNews Radio Network, 214-329-4949 colonel@prfirm1.com

 

Global Humanitarian Conference Calling for Technical Papers

Technological solutions to cure the world’s greatest human problems eagerly sought for conference in October

 

DALLAS (Jan. 17, 2013) – The organizing committee for the 2013 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC) has announced a call for papers on technology for the benefit of humanity.

Sought are scientists, engineers, technology professionals, academics, foundations, government and non-government organizations, field project managers, industry, investors, and other individuals engaged in humanitarian work, to discuss and develop solutions for present and future humanitarian needs.

Press coverage of the conference exhibits and presentations will be carried extensively on the ScienceNews Radio Network program Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason, locally produced in Dallas,Texas.

This is the IEEE flagship third annual cross-discipline conference on the world’s urgent human necessities and will be held October 20 – 23, 2013 in Silicon Valley, San Jose Airport Garden Hotel, California.

In following the Conference theme of Technology for the benefit of humanity, topics include [but are not limited to]:

  • Health, Medical Technology and Telemedicine
  • Disaster Warning/Avoidance and Response
  • Water Planning, Availability and Quality
  • Power for Off-Grid Users
  • Power Infrastructure/Off Grid Power/Renewable—Sustainable Energy
  • Connectivity and Communications Technologies for Remote Locations
  • Technologies (data/voice) for Remote Locations
  • Educational Technologies
  • Agricultural Technologies
  • Sanitation
  • Applying Science, Engineering and Technology for Sustainability
  • Humanitarian Challenges and Opportunities

Submission – Deadline for Full Paper Submission: May 11, 2013

The Conference Program will include submitted paper sessions, plenary and invited talks, tutorial sessions, poster sessions, student paper and poster contests, photo and video contests, a young professional project contest, and many opportunities for social and professional networking. More information on technical sessions, registration for the conference, hotel reservations and exhibiting is available at the website www.ieeeghtc.org.

Photo by IEEE member Jay Pearlman of training villagers in India last year for understanding technology – maps and remote sensing images for water harvesting can be seen here at The Examiner.

http://www.examiner.com/article/global-humanitarian-conference-calling-for-technical-papers

 


2012 Press Releases

GHTC 2012 Post-Conference Press Release PDF

 

November 1, 2012

IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference –

GHTC 2012

is a voice amplifier and a forum for hot technological, social, and philosophical debates   

The 2nd annual IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference – GHTC 2012 attracted over 250 attendees to Seattle October 21-24, bringing together individuals from 22 countries who are working to improve the lives of the billions of people around the world living at the bottom of the economic pyramid.

GHTC offers humanitarian workers and technologists across the globe an opportunity to interact, learn and collaborate, to build a community that can, because of these connections, create more efficient and effective humanitarian efforts. The conference was supported by over 35 organizations.

In addition to numerous technical papers, the conference held several tutorials on such topics as “Village Energy Systems” and “Building Affordable Wireless Networks,” and  eleven panels on such topics as “Designing for Sustainability”, “Societal Impacts and Benefits”, and “What Works and What Doesn’t”. 

The conference featured a number of plenary speakers. Gretchen Kalonji, UNESCO, noted that “opportunities for collaboration with the engineering community are huge, not only in the new UNESCO Engineering Initiative, but throughout our efforts in disasters, water, environmental sciences and in education… One of our meta-goals is to mobilize collaboration on scientific topics that require large-scale multinational cooperation.”  Gertjian van Stam, LinkNet Zambia, pointed that “the challenge is for technology to be introduced and utilized in the right manner, and with the right timing. Technology is a tool to help people. We need not just invest in technologies but also in relationships.”

Peter Staecker, 2012 IEEE President-Elect, set a vision to “harness the creative power of IEEE … and to bring a positive, meaningful and long-term impact on the welfare of significant populations.” At the same time Krista Bauer, GE Foundation, emphasized importance of deeper corporate involvement in the humanitarian projects saying that “GE has a strong volunteering tradition and volunteering is encouraged. People do want get involved. There is passion and a lot of interest.”

GHTC 2012 also hosted the Hoover Medal Award Ceremony, honoring N.R. Narayana Murthy, who founded Infosys in 1981. The Hoover Medal was established in 1929 and recognizes the civic and humanitarian achievements of engineers.

Contact :       

Verona Wong, Publicity Chair 604-415-6000 vwong@ieee.org 

Inessa Pearce, PR Chair & Webmaster 425-737-3411 inessaprc@gmail.com

 


 

GHTC 2012 Press Release August, 2012 PDF

 

August 8, 2012

Preliminary Program Released, Advance Registration Ends 7 September.   

Global Humanitarian Technology Conference – GHTC 2012 

October 21-24, 2012     Renaissance Seattle Hotel, Seattle, Washington, USA

A unique event, GHTC fills the need for a major international annual conference in the humanitarian technology sphere, attracting a large international audience, covering a wide range of important topics, and facilitating communication, networking and coordination across the humanitarian technology community.

Building on the success of the inaugural 2011 meeting, the 2nd annual GHTC will again bring together communities and individuals – engineering, science, technology, industry, academe, government agencies, NGOs, charities, funders – interested in applying technology to develop effective solutions for the challenges facing the world’s underserved.

GHTC has extensive and vibrant technical programs, unparalleled visibility for humanitarian work and projects, exceptional networking opportunities, and a varied social program which will include on October 23 a presentation of Hoover Award to Mr. N.R. Narayana Murthy, founder of Infosys Limited. The medal is a prestigious award for engineers, honoring individuals who tirelessly apply their extensive knowledge in the humanitarian field.

Numerous papers will be presented at the conference.  A sampling of paper presentations includes: “Empowering smallholders and local food markets with smartphones and social networks”,” Improving maternal labor monitoring in Kenya using digital pen technology: a user evaluation”, “Technology transfer to rural population through secondary schools : the Vigyan Ashram experience”. Four parallel half-day tutorials will be given preceding the conference on October 21 including “Building affordable wireless networks for research, education and humanitarian use”, and “Innovation process for the Base of the Pyramid”. Keynote speaker Byron Reese will talk about the world’s massive accumulation of data seen as an unexpected benefit in ending nations’ penchant for war. “You end war when you make peace a more attractive opportunity for everyone. Technology is making war extremely expensive and peace extremely profitable.” said Reese on the ScienceNews Radio Network.

Conference Chair Paul Kostek stated that “the Program Committee has done an extraordinary job of assembling this year’s program that addresses the leading issues, activities and technology applications in the humanitarian field. In addition, four tutorials give deeper understanding for real world solutions from the people that did the field work. We have a diverse group of keynote speakers from NGOs, government organizations and industry with Gretchen Kalonji, Assistant Director General for National Sciences, UNESCO, as an opening ceremony speaker.  Their experience and range of topics will help set the stage for each day of the conference. We are also pleased that the Hoover Medal will be presented at the conference to Mr. Naravara Murthy, Founder of Infosys Limited.”

GHTC 2012 is organized by IEEE ieee.org, the world’s largest technical professional society with over 400,000 members in over 160 countries, advancing technology for the benefit of humanity.

For more information on the preliminary program and to register, see  http://www.ieeeghtc.org/. The advance registration fee is $500 for IEEE members, $550 for non-members and $200 for students and  IEEE Life Members.

Contact :       

Gim Soon Wan, Publicity Chair 978-749-3358 GimSoon@ieee.org

Inessa Pearce, PR Chair & Webmaster 425-737-3411 inessaprc@gmail.com

 


 

GHTC 2012 Press Release March, 2012 PDF

 

March 6, 2012

Now Available: CALL FOR PAPERS

Global Humanitarian Technology Conference – GHTC 2012

October 21-24, 2012              Renaissance Seattle Hotel, Seattle, Washington, USA

GHTC 2012 is organized by IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional society with over 400,000 members in over 160 countries, advancing technology for the benefit of humanity.

Building on the success of the inaugural 2011 meeting, the 2nd annual GHTC will again bring together communities and individuals interested in applying technology to develop effective solutions for the challenges facing the world’s underserved. Engineering, science and technology are vital components of humanitarian development in a broad range of areas and there is an important need to recognize and emphasize this in the world’s development agenda. 

 

Conference Goals:

  • Foster exchange of information and networking in the humanitarian field
  • Focus attention of businesses on emerging market opportunities and related technology enablers
  • Impact in positive and meaningful ways lives of disadvantaged billions of people around the world
  • Promote science, engineering and technology as key to development of solutions for disadvantaged communities and attract young people to these professional fields

 

GHTC 2012 will cover a wide range of topics that include, but are not limited to:

  • Health, Medical Technology, Telemedicine
  • Water Planning, Availability and Quality
  • Disaster Warning, Avoidance, and Response
  • Sanitation
  • Educational Technologies
  • Agricultural Technologies
  • Power Infrastructure/Off-grid Power/Renewable and Sustainable Energy
  • Connectivity and Communications Technologies (data/voice) for Remote Locations
  • Applying Science, Engineering and Technology for Environmental Sustainability
  • Humanitarian Challenges and Opportunities

 

Why attend?

  • Participate in an extensive, vibrant, and varied technical program: presentations, keynote and invited talks, discussion sessions, tutorials, exhibits, and the Forum Hall for meeting other attendees
  • Learn, exchange information, share experiences and network with other interested and dedicated individuals 
  • Gain visibility for humanitarian work and projects
  • Find new resources and ideas

 

New for 2012:

 

Coming in 2013:

  • Young Professional Project Competition. We are looking for sponsors.

 

Contact :         

Gim Soon Wan, Publicity Chair 978-749-3358 GimSoon@ieee.org 

Inessa Pearce, Publicity Team 425-737-3411 inessaprc@gmail.com